Perinatal Neonatal

CompanyName


Exercise

Create and follow an exercise program

Start and stick to a fitness plan now, and you'll be rewarded with a healthy body that's fit for pregnancy. Plus, working up a little sweat is a great way to relieve the stress that can get in the way of getting pregnant.

A healthy exercise program includes 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise, such as walking or cycling and weight training, on most days of the week.

To increase flexibility, try stretching or yoga, and you'll have a really well-rounded fitness program. Once you're pregnant, it's okay — even recommended — to continue exercising. (That's unless if you have pregnancy complications and have been told not to, of course.)

If exercising hasn't been a priority for you lately, you'll need to ease into an exercise routine. Start with something tame, like walking ten to 20 minutes a day. Add more activity into your daily routine by taking the stairs instead of the elevator or parking your car a few blocks away from work.

If you love running 10Ks, can't live without your boot camp class, or push yourself to your limits spinning, it's time to modify your routine. Although high-intensity intervals are okay to continue during the Pre-conception stage if you've been doing them all along, according to Ogle, all-out efforts should be put on hold until after your baby is born. "Exercise is a form of stress on the body," Marshall says, "and anything in excess can do more harm than good, especially during this time."

Resources